Missouri biz to sell

When you sell your Missouri  business, and your first opportunity to qualify the small business buyer, will usually be by phone. It’s important that you control this conversation by asking the buyer a series of qualifying questions. But in fairness, you will have to answer a few questions from the prospect as well. Otherwise, they will not feel comfortable moving ahead with the process. Explain the absolute necessity of confidentiality and tell them you have prepared a Selling Memorandum which they are welcome to read after signing a confidentiality agreement.But you can give some general answers to the most basic questions now.Here are some questions you should be prepared to answer when you first talk with your prospect:

1.) Why are you selling?
2.) What is your price? Will you finance? What down payment are you looking for?
3.) How long has this business been in existence?
4.) How long have you been the owner?
5.) Will you stay on for a training period? / Will you be available after the sale for consultations?
6.) How much income can a new owner expect in the first year?
7.) What are the opportunities for growth? / Why is this business unique or special?Much of this information will have already been provided in your advertisement, but if you are talking to a buyer who was referred by your account, lawyer or some other source, this may be new information to them. Still, you should try to answer these most basic questions without divulging any confidential information.Question #1 is perhaps the most important question. A lot of the advice buyers read and hear them to be skeptical of an owner’s reasons for selling. After all, why would anybody want to sell a thriving business? Missouri buyers don’t have the right to know all the details about personal issues like health or a divorce, but you do need to have some prepared response to this question (health, retirement, pursuing new opportunities) that sounds reasonable and positive.

business broker online

Hopefully question #7 will be the focus of the entire conversation. If you haven’t already done so, take some time right now to list some of the positives about your business.Taking The Next Step: After answering a couple of questions, try to get an e-mail address or fax number where you can send the confidentiality agreement. Let them know that once you have received this form, you will send them your Selling Memorandum with more detailed information.Any viable, professional and reasonable candidate should be perfectly agreeable with this process.Anyone who wants you to give them detailed and personal information about your business without signing a confidentiality agreement is being unreasonable.
If they are unreasonable now, they will be that way throughout the entire process.You can save yourself a lot of time and frustration by cutting them loose right now.

One Other Piece Of Advice: In all your phone conversations take notes. Your prospects will give you clues on how to sell them – if you get them talking about their goals and priorities.

It may be weeks before you meet in person and you’ll forget too much valuable information in the interim if you don’t take notes.Notes about what?Their goals, their aspirations, their experience, the names of their spouse and children, why they want to own their own business, those aspects of your business that most interested them, etc. etc.The selling process begins the moment you first speak with your prospect. Start to learn as much about them and what makes them tick as you can. It will pay dividends as you move into the negotiating phase of the sale.

Selling Your Business to a Buyer in Missouri 

When you sell your business your first meaningful discussion, and your first opportunity to qualify the small business buyer, will usually be by phone. It's important that you control this conversation by asking the buyer a series of qualifying questions.But in fairness, you will have to answer a few questions from the prospect as well. Otherwise they will not feel comfortable moving ahead with the process.Explain the absolute necessity of confidentiality and tell them you have prepared a Selling Memorandum which they are welcome to read after signing a confidentiality agreement.But you can give some general answers to the most basic questions now.Here are some questions you should be prepared to answer when you first talk with your prospect:1.) Why are you selling? 2.) What is your price? Will you finance? What down payment are you looking for? 3.) How long has this business been in existence? 4.) How long have you been the owner? 5.) Will you stay on for a training period? / Will you be available after the sale for consultations? 6.) How much income can a new owner expect in the first year? 7.) What are the opportunities for growth? / Why is this business unique or special?Much of this information will have already been provided in your advertisement, but if you are talking to a buyer who was referred by your account, lawyer or some other source, this may be new information to them. Still you should try to answer these most basic questions without divulging any confidential information.Question #1 is perhaps the most important question. A lot of the advice buyers read and hear tells them to be skeptical of an owner's reasons for selling. After all, why would anybody want to sell a thriving business?Buyers don't have the right to know all the details about personal issues like health or a divorce, but you do need to have some prepared response to this question (health, retirement, pursuing new opportunities) that sounds reasonable and positive.Hopefully question #7 will be the focus of the entire conversation. If you haven't already done so, take some time right now to list some of the positives about your business.Taking The Next Step:After answering a couple of questions, try to get an e-mail address or fax number where you can send the confidentiality agreement. Let them know that once you have received this form, you will send them your Selling Memorandum with more detailed information.Any viable, professional and reasonable candidate should be perfectly agreeable with this process.Anyone who wants you to give them detailed and personal information about your business without signing a confidentiality agreement is being unreasonable. If they are unreasonable now, they will be that way throughout the entire process.You can save yourself a lot of time and frustration by cutting them loose right now.One Other Piece Of Advice:In all your phone conversations take notes. Your prospects will give you clues on how to sell them - if you get them talking about their goals and priorities. It may be weeks before you actually meet in person and you'll forget too much valuable information in the interim if you don't take notes.Notes about what?Their goals, their aspirations, their experience, the names of their spouse and children, why they want to own their own business, those aspects of your business that most interested them etc. etc.The selling process begins the moment you first speak with your prospect. Start to learn as much about them and what makes them tick as you can. It will pay dividends as you move into the negotiating phase of the sale. business broker online When you sell your business your first meaningful discussion, and your first opportunity to qualify the small business buyer, will usually be by phone. It's important that you control this conversation by asking the buyer a series of qualifying questions.But in fairness, you will have to answer a few questions from the prospect as well. Otherwise they will not feel comfortable moving ahead with the process.Explain the absolute necessity of confidentiality and tell them you have prepared a Selling Memorandum which they are welcome to read after signing a confidentiality agreement.But you can give some general answers to the most basic questions now.Here are some questions you should be prepared to answer when you first talk with your prospect:1.) Why are you selling? 2.) What is your price? Will you finance? What down payment are you looking for? 3.) How long has this business been in existence? 4.) How long have you been the owner? 5.) Will you stay on for a training period? / Will you be available after the sale for consultations? 6.) How much income can a new owner expect in the first year? 7.) What are the opportunities for growth? / Why is this business unique or special?Much of this information will have already been provided in your advertisement, but if you are talking to a buyer who was referred by your account, lawyer or some other source, this may be new information to them. Still you should try to answer these most basic questions without divulging any confidential information.Question #1 is perhaps the most important question. A lot of the advice buyers read and hear tells them to be skeptical of an owner's reasons for selling. After all, why would anybody want to sell a thriving business?Buyers don't have the right to know all the details about personal issues like health or a divorce, but you do need to have some prepared response to this question (health, retirement, pursuing new opportunities) that sounds reasonable and positive.Hopefully question #7 will be the focus of the entire conversation. If you haven't already done so, take some time right now to list some of the positives about your business.Taking The Next Step:After answering a couple of questions, try to get an e-mail address or fax number where you can send the confidentiality agreement. Let them know that once you have received this form, you will send them your Selling Memorandum with more detailed information.Any viable, professional and reasonable candidate should be perfectly agreeable with this process.Anyone who wants you to give them detailed and personal information about your business without signing a confidentiality agreement is being unreasonable. If they are unreasonable now, they will be that way throughout the entire process.You can save yourself a lot of time and frustration by cutting them loose right now.One Other Piece Of Advice:In all your phone conversations take notes. Your prospects will give you clues on how to sell them - if you get them talking about their goals and priorities. It may be weeks before you actually meet in person and you'll forget too much valuable information in the interim if you don't take notes.Notes about what?Their goals, their aspirations, their experience, the names of their spouse and children, why they want to own their own business, those aspects of your business that most interested them etc. etc.The selling process begins the moment you first speak with your prospect. Start to learn as much about them and what makes them tick as you can. It will pay dividends as you move into the negotiating phase of the sale.

Missouri